AaronLore's blog

CONDENSATE DRAINAGE FOR HIGH EFFICIENCY GAS FIRED FURNACES & WATER HEATERS

Condensate Drainage For High Efficiency Gas Fired Furnaces & water heaters

 

Furnace condensate is acidic, and some states/provinces/countries may require the condensate to be neutralized prior to draining.

 

High efficiency (or 90%, or condensing) furnaces use a set of two heat exchangers in order to retrieve more heat from the combustion products than their mid-efficiency counterparts.  Because of this, they generate flue gases much colder than those of a mid-efficiency or natural draft unit.  This not only completely changes the way the furnace has to be vented (I will talk about venting specifically in a later tip) but also, and it’s what we’ll focus on, a lot of condensates is generated.  This water comes from two sources:  moisture which was already present in the combustion air, and the combustion process itself, as the hydrogen atoms from the natural gas molecules (methane, CH4) combine with oxygen to form water. Now as technicians you don’t need to know this part but if you’re a bit into chemistry, here’s the basic chemical equation:

 

 The trap needs to be cleaned out regularly, and that should be done every maintenance.  Rinse it out, make sure water flows through the trap properly from all its ports.  If there’s any poor flow, fill it up and blow through it a few times to get the dirt out.  Hotter water helps for stubborn blockages.  The need for regular cleaning also means that drains should be installed as much as possible in a way that allows for the trap to be easily removed.  I highly recommend using clamped flexible hoses for the drain, as close as possible to the trap.  Avoid hard-piping the whole drain, as it will be impossible to remove and clean out the trap.

 

 Make sure every component that produces condensate is sloped towards the drain.  That means slope the venting down towards the furnace (typically a ¼’’ slope per foot of length, minimum), and also, slope the furnace itself!  Look in your install manual, most manufacturers will call for the furnace to be installed with a slight forward pitch to allow condensate to drain from the heat exchanger.

 

 This is another reason to have your gas fire appliances serviced and inspected once a year.

 
 
 
Syndicate content